Breast Cancer and Herceptin (Trastuzumab)

During my treatment for breast cancer, I was part of a medical trial in relation to the effecacy of the drug Herceotin (Trastuzumab). Herceptin is a drug that belongs to the group of drug treatments called targetted or biological therapies. It stops specific ways that breat cancer cells divide and grow. I was treated with Herceptin because my cancer cells were found to have a higher than normal level of the protein Human Epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on their surfaces. That stimulates the cancer cells to breast-cancer-s10-photo-of-her-2-genegrow. Herceptin works by attaching itself to the HER2 receptors so that the cancer cells no longer grow. it also stimulates the body’s immune system to fight the cancer cells.

I am one of the 20% of breast cancer patients to benefit from Herceptin as my tumours were the fast growing ones that are HER2 positive. I was given the Herceptin along with chemotherapy after my surgery in order to reduce the chance of the tumours spreading or returning. If your breast cancer is not HER2 positive or, indeed, HER2 negative, Herceptin will not be effective to you.

The Herceptin treatment I was given for my breast cancer was given to me intravenously through my Hickman line on the same days as my other chemotherapy. I was treated every three weeks as an out patient. However, the days were long, as the Herceptin was given over 90 minutes with additional time taken to give me saline solutions and my chemotherapy. I had to stay in hospital for several hours in case I was allergic to the treatment. Luckily I was not. However, like all drugs, Herceptin has side effects.

The common side effects of Herceptin include: feeling like you have flu, nausea and diarrhoea. I had all of these. I felt pain in my muscles and joints and often felt breast-cancer-s2-breast-cancer-illustrationlike I had a temperature so I swung between feeling hot and cold. I also had to have treatment with anit-sickness drugs for the servere nausea I suffered. I also got medecine from the hospital to counter the diarrhoea that I suffered.

The trial I was part of was looking into reducing the period of time that women are treated with herceptin, to see if it makes a difference to the efficacy. The usual period for getting Herceptin is about a year. I was treated with it for 9 weeks. I found the hospital visits and the side effects very draining, so, although I had initially felt diappointed that I was only receiving the treatment for a shorter period, in the end I was quite glad to get to the end of the course of Herceptin.

Valerie Penny

 

 

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Life on Letrozole After Breast Cancer

letrozoleAfter completion of my chemotherapy and just as my radiotherapy started I required to start taking letrozole: just one 2.5mg tablet per day. A 2.5mg tablet each day for 5 years. This is because my breast cancer wasa type that needs the hormone oestrogen to grow. In women who have been through the menopause, the main source of oestrogen is through the change of sex hormones called androgens into oestrogen. An enzyme called ‘aromatase’ is needed for this change to occur. Letrozole works by inhibiting (or blocking) this enzyme. This reduces the amount of oestrogen in your body, which slows the growth of the cancer cells, should they recur. It is my fervent hope that they will not.

I am ashamed to say that I never read the information given with medication, although I know I should. The manufacturer’s leaflet will give more information about letrozole and a full list of the side effects which may be experienced from taking it. I have to take other tablets daily as well. So I take one 2.5 mg tablet of letrozole each morning with my other medication, although you may take letrozole at whatever time of day you find easiest to remember, but try to take your doses at the same time each day. This will helps to avoid missing any doses. You can take the tablets before or after your meals. If you forget to take a dose, take it as soon as you remember. If you do not remember until the following day, skip the missed dose. Do not take two doses together to make up for a forgotten dose. I suppose one tablet out of 5 years will not make much difference.

However, along with their useful effects, most medicines can cause unwanted side effects although not everyone breast-cancerexperiences them. If you have read other articles in this blog, you will realise, that my primary mind set is always that these things cannot happen to me. Of course, sometimes they can and they do. That is just life. Also, because I do not read the manufacturers leaflets, I did not know the side effects to expect. However, Letrozole has a raft of side effects and I seem to have been blessed with most of them. The common side effects are as follows:

1) Hot flushes and sweating: yes, I get this one! I thought it was my time of life, but no, I owe this joy to Letrozole so I try to keep cool by wearing light, airy clothes or in winter, I wear layers, so I can take them off as required.
2) Headache, muscle or joint pain: oh wow! I have this one in spades. You can ask your doctor or pharmacist to recommend a suitable painkiller but I do not like to take any more tablets than I have to, so I try to manage the pain with rest, hot water bottles or ignoring it before I give in to the painkillers. The dull ache of the joint and pain is a persistent, nagging pain that drains the drive and strength out of me. It is inescapable.
3) Feeling tired, weak or dizzy: Oh, you guessed, I find this side effect really, really debilitating. I simply cannot do all that I did before I got ill. Some days I cannot get up, some days I have to take a nap, sometimes I just cannot move. I get so indescribably weary and tired. I get cross with myself and irritated but it does not explain this side effect to say that I get tired. The tiredness makes me bone weary. My limbs feel heavy, my concentration is affected. My eyes cannot stay open. At other times I cannot sleep at night, so that makes me tired too. I do not drive or use tools or machines until I feel fit enough to do that.
4) Feeling or being sick, indigestion, abdominal pain: Hurrah! I do not get this one! I stick to simple meals, generally avoid rich or spicy foods and I am very careful about my diet.
5) Constipation: I occasionally suffer from this one but I try to eat a well-balanced diet and drink several glasses of water each day.I also drink copious amounts of tea, mostly English Breakfast tea, sometimes Earl Grey.
6) Diarrhoea: Nope, I do not get this one: if you do, remember to drink plenty of water to replace the lost fluids.
7) Appetite changes, weight changes, feeling depressed, hair loss, skin rash, swollen legs or feet, vaginal bleeding: I am blessed with some of these, the most immediately obvious is that my hair has become very thin. Sometimes I wear a hat because my head gets cold, my hairdresser is a magician and always makes me look and feel like a million dollars. The other one of these side effects that I have to cope with is depression. I have suffered depressionfrom depression for many years any way and now it is reasonably well controlled. It is just difficult having another potential source of that mental health problem.
8) High blood levels of cholesterol or high blood pressure. I do not suffer from either of these. I am lucky in that my blood pressure sits fairly low anyway and my doctor also arranges for me to regular have tests to check that these side effects are not rearing their ugly heads.

As I suffer with so many side effects of Letrozole, I have been offered the opportunity to change to another tablet. However, I have declined to do so. I know what the side effects of Letrozole are and I can cope with them, more importantly my long suffering husband knows what they are and he can also cope with them. So for the remainder of the 5 year period, I will cope and I will be grateful that I am being successfully treated for breast cancer. I am a lucky woman.

Valerie Penny

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